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JUST ANNOUNCED: The CNA Apprenticeship is coming to Medford this fall! Contact us to apply.

June 2021 Newsletter

Group picture of Cohort 2 learning new skills from career coaches Regis (left) and Kaitlyn (right).
Group picture of Cohort 2 learning new skills from career coaches Regis (left) and Kaitlyn (right).

Cohort Updates

The CNA Apprenticeship keeps moving forward one cohort at a time. The final apprentice from Cohort 1 triumphantly passed their certification exam with the support of fellow apprentices and career coaches.
Meanwhile Cohort 2 has moved to on-the-job training and Cohort 3 is starting their online coursework. Cohort 3 is unique in that it’s made up entirely of apprentices who reside outside the Portland metropolitan area.

Finally, recruitment has started for the upcoming fourth cohort and the CareWorks team is looking forward to training 30 new apprentices in Portland-metro facilities. This will be our most ambitious recruitment cycle yet!

Group picture of Cohort 2 learning new skills from career coaches Regis (left) and Kaitlyn (right).
Group picture of Cohort 2 learning new skills from career coaches Regis (left) and Kaitlyn (right).

Cohort Updates 

The CNA Apprenticeship keeps moving forward one cohort at a time. The final apprentice from Cohort 1 triumphantly passed their certification exam with the support of fellow apprentices and career coaches.
Meanwhile Cohort 2 has moved to on-the-job training and Cohort 3 is starting their online coursework. Cohort 3 is unique in that it’s made up entirely of apprentices who reside outside the Portland metropolitan area.

Finally, recruitment has started for the upcoming fourth cohort and the CareWorks team is looking forward to training 30 new apprentices in Portland-metro facilities. This will be our most ambitious recruitment cycle yet!
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Using Facebook to Capture the Data

The Long-Term CareWorks team has been working to conduct surveys with 3,237 current and former CNAs. The team has now reached out to 2,425 and are working on a report drawn from the survey results. However, about half of the list of CNAs haven’t responded to initial messages or still need to be reached.
In order to boost the recognition and importance of the CareWorks CNA survey, the data team partnered with the organization’s communicator to create a short video advertisement. The ad was circulated on Facebook mid-June and targeted toward those who haven’t participated in the survey. The goal is to create interest and familiarity with CareWorks and motivate CNA professionals to participate. Click here to check out the video!

Courtesy of Google Images.
Courtesy of Google Images.

Using Facebook to Capture the Data

The Long-Term CareWorks team has been working to conduct surveys with 3,237 current and former CNAs. The team has now reached out to 2,425 and are working on a report drawn from the survey results. However, about half of the list of CNAs haven’t responded to initial messages or still need to be reached.
In order to boost the recognition and importance of the CareWorks CNA survey, the data team partnered with the organization’s communicator to create a short video advertisement. The ad was circulated on Facebook mid-June and targeted toward those who haven’t participated in the survey. The goal is to create interest and familiarity with CareWorks and motivate CNA professionals to participate. Click here to check out the video! 
Courtesy of Google Images.
Courtesy of Google Images.

Career Coach Kaitlyn Nguyen Q&A 

Kaitlyn Nguyen is the newest career coach. She started caregiving in high school shadowing her mom and has done it ever since. Although she intends to become a registered nurse eventually, she enjoys supporting new CNAs entering an intense and rewarding career.

Q: Why did you decide to work in the medical field?
A: My parents are both nurses and in high school I really liked and understood my human anatomy and physiology class. My mom had me shadow her during a night shift at her workplace, which is actually where I worked 10 years later. When I got older my grandparents stayed with us, so being a caregiver for them gave me a glimpse into what it’s like to be a healthcare worker. I just realized that as a caregiver or healthcare worker I could directly influence the quality of care that I provide.
Q: What are your favorite memories as a caregiver?
A: I was a float CNA at this facility so I didn’t really have a preferred unit. On the long-term care side, there was one resident that would always stay up all night in their wheelchair looking miserable. They would call out all night that they want to go home and not let anyone touch them. Residents didn’t really know me as much as other CNAs because I was a float, but on my last shift, I was on the side with that resident who was sitting there. I gently approached them with a big smile and talked to them quietly. They responded well and were smiling and laughing and even allowed me to take them back to their room to help them into bed, which wasn’t normal because they would stay up all night. That encounter really made me feel like the job was worth it. Even if it’s really hard, it’s nice to know that you did something to make their night or day a little bit easier.
Kaitlyn (right) coaching an apprentice.
Kaitlyn (right) coaching an apprentice.
Q: What do you love about being a career coach?
A: I initially became a CNA because I wanted to be an RN and I ended up staying on as a CNA a lot longer than I thought. I was getting a little burnt out at the hospital even though I wouldn’t admit that to myself. I had gotten to the point where I felt like I had plateaued. I saw this opportunity to build the skills needed to be an RN and push me past my comfort zone, and I really liked the idea of what this apprenticeship offered. There should be more rolling out processes like this for any CNA program because it provides a great opportunity and makes sure people are supported. I could’ve used a career coach of my own when I became a CNA. Most training is three days and then you’re expected to work like everyone else. People have those skills, it’s just they’re not used to taking care of that many people in that capacity and it was really scary sometimes.

Career Coach Kaitlyn Nguyen Q&A 

Kaitlyn Nguyen is the newest career coach. She started caregiving in high school shadowing her mom and has done it ever since. Although she intends to become a registered nurse eventually, she enjoys supporting new CNAs entering an intense and rewarding career.
Q: Why did you decide to work in the medical field?
A: My parents are both nurses and in high school I really liked and understood my human anatomy and physiology class. My mom had me shadow her during a night shift at her workplace, which is actually where I worked 10 years later. When I got older my grandparents stayed with us, so being a caregiver for them gave me a glimpse into what it’s like to be a healthcare worker. I just realized that as a caregiver or healthcare worker I could directly influence the quality of care that I provide.
Q: What are your favorite memories as a caregiver?
A: I was a float CNA at this facility so I didn’t really have a preferred unit. On the long-term care side, there was one resident that would always stay up all night in their wheelchair looking miserable. They would call out all night that they want to go home and not let anyone touch them. Residents didn’t really know me as much as other CNAs because I was a float, but on my last shift, I was on the side with that resident who was sitting there. I gently approached them with a big smile and talked to them quietly. They responded well and were smiling and laughing and even allowed me to take them back to their room to help them into bed, which wasn’t normal because they would stay up all night. That encounter really made me feel like the job was worth it. Even if it’s really hard, it’s nice to know that you did something to make their night or day a little bit easier.
Kaitlyn (right) coaching an apprentice.
Kaitlyn (right) coaching an apprentice.
Q: What do you love about being a career coach?
A: I initially became a CNA because I wanted to be an RN and I ended up staying on as a CNA a lot longer than I thought. I was getting a little burnt out at the hospital even though I wouldn’t admit that to myself. I had gotten to the point where I felt like I had plateaued. I saw this opportunity to build the skills needed to be an RN and push me past my comfort zone, and I really liked the idea of what this apprenticeship offered. There should be more rolling out processes like this for any CNA program because it provides a great opportunity and makes sure people are supported. I could’ve used a career coach of my own when I became a CNA. Most training is three days and then you’re expected to work like everyone else. People have those skills, it’s just they’re not used to taking care of that many people in that capacity and it was really scary sometimes.