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JUST ANNOUNCED: The CNA Apprenticeship is coming to Medford this fall! Contact us to apply.

May 2021 Newsletter

Cohort 1 learning new skills.
Cohort 1 learning new skills.

CareWorks CNA Apprenticeship Becomes Registered. First of Its Kind in the Nation. 

After a successful pilot launch and over a year of planning and collaborating with partners across the State of Oregon, the Long-Term CareWorks Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Apprenticeship was officially approved by the Apprenticeship Training Division in Oregon’s Bureau of Labor and Industry, making it the first registered CNA apprenticeship in the State of Oregon. 

With this approval, the Apprenticeship also becomes the first registered program of its kind to offer wraparound services and yearlong mentorship to its participants.

Pilot cohorts 1 and 2 will be retroactively included in this approval and will receive credit for all related training. This is a big step forward for apprenticeships and for the long-term care Industry. 

Cohort 1 learning new skills.
Cohort 1 learning new skills.

CareWorks CNA Apprenticeship Becomes Registered. First of Its Kind in the Nation. 

After a successful pilot launch and over a year of planning and collaborating with partners across the State of Oregon, the Long-Term CareWorks Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Apprenticeship was officially approved by the Apprenticeship Training Division in Oregon’s Bureau of Labor and Industry, making it the first registered CNA apprenticeship in the State of Oregon. With this approval, the Apprenticeship also becomes the first registered program of its kind to offer wraparound services and yearlong mentorship to its participants. Pilot cohorts 1 and 2 will be retroactively included in this approval and will receive credit for all related training. This is a big step forward for apprenticeships and for the long-term care Industry.

First Cohort Completes Clinicals & Cohort 2 Begins

The pilot cohort for the Long-Term CareWorks Apprenticeship soared through clinical weeks and has jumped right into on-the-job training employment with EmpRes Portland Health and Rehabilitation and Avamere Rehabilitation of Hillsboro.

Group photo of Cohort 1
Group photo of Cohort 1
Group photo of Cohort 1
Group photo of Cohort 1

First Cohort Completes Clinicals & Cohort 2 Begins

The pilot cohort for the Long-Term CareWorks Apprenticeship soared through clinical weeks and has jumped right into on-the-job training employment with EmpRes Portland Health and Rehabilitation and Avamere Rehabilitation of Hillsboro.

Career Coach Regis Costa Q&A 

Regis Costa is a Career Coach training future CNAs through the Long-term CareWorks Apprenticeship. He has an extensive background as a CNA and has dedicated his life to helping people. Although he’s now dedicated to helping train a new generation of CNAs, we spoke with Regis about his time as a CNA and why he enjoyed this career.

Q: What attracted you to becoming a CNA?
A: I went through a major surgery. I had no family, just my partner who had to support me because I was in the hospital. A lot of things went through my head, like, nothing matters anymore, if I die, so be it. But then those CNAs and nurses came in and started helping me do things that I should’ve been doing but couldn’t. Then something awakened in me. There might be people in hospitals right now that have no one and are scared. These people really cared and made a difference in my life, and I just felt like I should be out there helping people too.
Q: What do you think is the best part about being a CNA?
A: You are rewarded, not always financially, but emotionally. Even if it’s just a thank you, you know you made a difference in someone’s life. It’s hard from time to time, but caring for another person—a person whose family might not be there and who depends on you—for me, that’s everything.
Regis Costa (right) training apprentice.
Regis Costa (right) training apprentice.
Q: Was there any patient in particular that you remember or that you really connected with?
A: I was in a hospital caring for this gentleman. He had the surgery and his lower body was filled up with drains and tubing—so he was very upset. He tried to pull out the tubing and the drainage saying he was done because he couldn’t walk again. I told him that’s not true, people care and you are not a burden. I pointed out “What about your wife? She’s always here. She needs you. She would miss you so much… What about your dogs?! Who’s going to walk them?” Eventually, he stopped pulling the tubing. The medication started working and he started smiling again. He held my hand and thanked me saying “Yeah. Who is going to walk my dogs?”

Career Coach Regis Costa Q&A 

Regis Costa is a Career Coach training future CNAs through the Long-term CareWorks Apprenticeship. He has an extensive background as a CNA and has dedicated his life to helping people. Although he’s now dedicated to helping train a new generation of CNAs, we spoke with Regis about his time as a CNA and why he enjoyed this career.
Q: What attracted you to becoming a CNA?
A: I went through a major surgery. I had no family, just my partner who had to support me because I was in the hospital. A lot of things went through my head, like, nothing matters anymore, if I die, so be it. But then those CNAs and nurses came in and started helping me do things that I should’ve been doing but couldn’t. Then something awakened in me. There might be people in hospitals right now that have no one and are scared. These people really cared and made a difference in my life, and I just felt like I should be out there helping people too.
Q: What do you think is the best part about being a CNA?
A: You are rewarded, not always financially, but emotionally. Even if it’s just a thank you, you know you made a difference in someone’s life. It’s hard from time to time, but caring for another person—a person whose family might not be there and who depends on you—for me, that’s everything.
Regis Costa (right) training apprentice.
Regis Costa (right) training apprentice.
Q: Was there any patient in particular that you remember or that you really connected with?
A: I was in a hospital caring for this gentleman. He had the surgery and his lower body was filled up with drains and tubing—so he was very upset. He tried to pull out the tubing and the drainage saying he was done because he couldn’t walk again. I told him that’s not true, people care and you are not a burden. I pointed out “What about your wife? She’s always here. She needs you. She would miss you so much… What about your dogs?! Who’s going to walk them?” Eventually, he stopped pulling the tubing. The medication started working and he started smiling again. He held my hand and thanked me saying “Yeah. Who is going to walk my dogs?”